Anadol STC-16

Note: Unlike most of the vehicles featured on Car of the Day, there's an impressive amount of Otosan Anadol STC-16 information online. Like I do every day, the sources are clearly listed. But in this case, he two main sources carlustblog.com and anadol-stc6.com are highly recommended if you're interested in learning more about today's car.

via anadol-stc16.com

via anadol-stc16.com

Update 03/08/14: In the Car of the Day email I incorrectly stated that the car weighs more than 2,000 kg; this is false—it weighs a little more than 2,000 lbs (907 kg.) The text below has been updated.


Turkey isn't the first place you'd look for an under appreciated sports coupe.

via anadol-stc16.com

via anadol-stc16.com

After all, with a history of literally no automotive mass production before 1966, just finding the expertise, parts, and facilities  to cobble something together would have been a massive undertaking.

Some blame the eventual failure of Turkish car brands like Anadol on imports: hungry for vehicles but with no local manufacturing, American and European imports have always been in the majority.

Why would they stand idle as Turkey spins itself into a global automotive manufacturing powerhouse, right?

As the second production Turkish-made car, did the STC-16 show the world a better way of making a sports car?

via anadol-stc16.com

via anadol-stc16.com

Based on the Anadol A1/A2 sedan chassis, the car's wheelbase was shortened and a suspension not unlike what you'd find in most of the sports cars of the period was installed: independent suspension up front, with a live rear axle out back.

Ford provided a 1600cc four-cylinder engine with about 67 horsepower; it was hooked up to a Ford four-speed manual transmission. With a little more than 907 kg to cart around (2,000 lbs.), its overall performance was quick, but not class-leading.

via anadol-stc16.com

via anadol-stc16.com

via anadol-stc16.com

via anadol-stc16.com

It's funny reading modern reports on the car; one of the websites dedicated to the car says, "The STC-16 had all the typical dashboard gauges and indicators which the British and Italian sports cars of that period had,"—sounds like STC-16 designers were circling photos of stuff they liked in Road & Track!

The car entered production in April 1973, probably the worst possible time to introduce a sports car. With the Arab Oil Embargo in full swing, the cost of producing the car's fiberglass bodies shot up.

via anadol-stc16.com

via anadol-stc16.com

Anadol entered the car in both local and international rallies, with the racing version of the car sporting numerous upgrades—my favourite is the fiberglass chassis the factory team is said to have campaigned.

An Anadol STC-16 in modern rally competition. via fotomobildunyam.com

An Anadol STC-16 in modern rally competition. via fotomobildunyam.com

Even if it had won the Monte Carlo Rally t was never going to be a best-selling car, however. Strictly a 2-seater, it was priced in excess of a third more than other Anadol models and was comparable in cost to a more expertly engineered European car.

At most, 176 Anadol STC-16s rolled off the assembly line; fewer than 30 exist today.

Why bother making a Turkish sports car? Because they could.

Isn't that enough?


Sources / Recommended reading